All posts by James M. Shaw, Jr., LS

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The Hydrous: Mapping Vanishing Reefs

This entry is part 2 of 8 in the series June 2017Using geospatial technologies, The Hydrous provides “open access” to oceans in an attempt to save critical habitats. The oceans of the world are vital to our survival. While monitoring their health is the realm of scientists and protecting their health is the responsibility of...

A professional portrait of James M Shaw in a green shirt and green tie

Industry Innovation: Are You Ready to be Relevant?

This entry is part 1 of 6 in the series February 2017Slay the beast named Apathy with progress. This is a dire warning. There is a beast that threatens to destroy the land surveying profession. It is a danger to you, your company, your coworkers, and your employees. It sucks the life from all it...

Finding Your Voice & 40 Under 40

DON’T MISS XYHT’S OUTLOOK 2017, the 40 Under 40 (40 < 40) special issue. You have there a valuable resource. Be prepared to visit the future of geospatial: featured are the upcoming leaders of our profession. Unless you are lucky enough to have one of these individuals on your staff, they are your competitors. If...

Guest Essay: I Cannot Wait to Be Part of the Future

This entry is part 6 of 13 in the series March 2013“As a surveyor in my forties, I must be ready for any future change,” says James Shaw Jr., president-elect of the Maryland Society of Surveyors and their Surveyor of the Year for 2012. James represents the new wave of leadership in the surveying profession:...

Guest Editorial: How the Future Surveyor Can Be Relevant

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series April 2014I wrote a guest essay in the March 2013 issue of PSM portraying my vision of the future.  I believe I made a miscalculation—the “future” is progressing very rapidly, and a lot of what I envisioned is already here. Here are several notable examples. Locata,...

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Surveying

This entry is part 8 of 11 in the series Outlook 2015Above: This bridge in Baltimore took 1 hour and 45 minutes to scan: 550 feet of roadway or 1.5 acres, including all the beams for the underside of the bridge for clearance and engineering design. Reality Capture, Targetless Registration, the End of Dedicated Field Crews...