Category Archives: Surveying

GIS Time-slices, Digital Media Over Time

Recently I was trying to track down some of my older URISA papers and presentations. I wanted to have all (most anyway) of my professional papers in one format together. Wow what a job (still in progress) with different Mac and PC formats over the years, different operating systems, different media and different hardware—what a...

CERN

“The actual state of our knowledge is always provisional and … there must be, beyond what is actually known, immense new regions to discover” – Louis de Broglie “Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire” (European Council for Nuclear Research), the celebrated research center in Geneva, Switzerland and home to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), holds...

The UAS Scene

The Association for Unmanned Systems International is a 10-year old association dedicated to tracking products, research, and applications for unmanned vehicles. This year’s conference in May in Orlando brought over 6,500 conference-goers to see products and information at the booths of over 500 exhibitors. The primary focus of the conference was airborne vehicles, but marine...

State of: Technology in Oil and Gas

Perhaps more so now than when Bob Dylan first penned the lyrics to The Times They Are A-Changing, this title line carries a sense of urgency, and it continues to reverberate with a significance that transcends any specific moment in time. We now live in an age where nothing is more constant than change, and...

State of: Surveying

Surveying is the timeless science and profession of geographic measurement and boundary determination that has evolved over the centuries, constantly improving with advancements in technology to keep pace with the world around it. One aspect, however, has not and should not change: the fact that surveying is a profession. Per professional licensure and supporting laws,...

State of: Close-Range Photogrammetry

By definition, close-range photogrammetry (CRP) is simply photogrammetric data collection and processing where the subject is less than 1,000 feet away. Collection methods can be both ground- or aerial-based, and the final output can be rendered either two- or three-dimensionally. Several factors have made this a powerful tool for geospatial professionals. The strongest of these...