All posts by Matteo Luccio

Navigating Without Addresses

New codes aim to bring billions of people into the geospatial market. When we mail a letter to an address in an industrialized country or navigate to that location, we rely, without giving it much thought, on a centuries-old system of street names and numbers, augmented in the case of mail by the later invention...

Satellite Imagery’s Impact

Above: The highest resolution of commercial satellite imagery is still more than an order of magnitude lower than the highest resolution attainable from aerial platforms. Keystone Aerial Surveys, Inc. developed this digital surface model from 1.75 cm digital imagery taken with a low-altitude flight. The resolution is sufficiently high to enable its use for mapping...

Feature: Under Thin Ice

An exceptional set of explorers surveys the caves inside a dying glacier on the side of Mt. Hood in Oregon. All photos courtesy of Brent McGregor, except where noted. Editor’s Note: High-profile scientific questions permeate the public consciousness, and surveying, mapping, and field data collection are the “ground truth” element of geophysical scientific research. This...

CLIVE: Communicating Risk in 3D

Above: The current sea level and coastline of the city of Charlottetown on Prince Edward Island, Canada.     Static 3D models of topography and buildings are commonplace in both technical and popular geospatial software. There are still very few 3D tools, however, that enable users to geo-visualize dynamic phenomena, such as the effects of climate...

Mapping the Damage from Superstorm Sandy

In the wake of the devastation wreaked along the East Coast by Superstorm Sandy, government agencies and private companies partnered to quickly and efficiently collect and analyze aerial data for emergency responders, relief and reconstruction workers, and the public in need. When it hit the United States as a post-tropical cyclone, Sandy had a diameter...

The Oregon Lidar Consortium

A statewide, airborne, lidar-collection effort achieves wide area coverage and high data quality on a low budget. Images courtesy of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and created by Daniel E. Coe In less than six years since it was formed, the Oregon Lidar Consortium (OLC) has collected 16 million acres of high-resolution data, which is...