Category Archives: Cartography

Outlook 2020’s 40 Under 40

The following is xyHt’s 2020 collection of 40 under 40: profiles of motivated and accomplished young professionals under 40 years of age. Click on each name to view their profiles below. Kwabena Obeng Asiam Researcher & Lecturer – Leibniz University Published PhD candidate in land administration; FIG Young Surveyors Ghana Evaluating the evidence and making professional...

Using Real Road Signs in GIS

At the moment, I am doing a little work with the construction industry that requires road signs and markings placed on a map to show where signs need to move as the site(s) moves through different phases. Now, a real cartographer nerd would say that good graphics and symbolization would negate the need for placing...

Vibrant Africa

Half-Earth Day 2019

E.O. Wilson Spearheads a Global Call to Action In 2016, Edward O. Wilson, the “Father of Biodiversity,” wrote a book called Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life. In the third part of a trilogy, after The Social Conquest of Earth and The Meaning of Human Existence, Wilson refutes our impending sixth extinction and argues the...

Mapbox

Mapbox cARTography

Over the last few months I’ve just had to get my hands dirty again with Mapbox. For those who don’t know what Mapbox is, let me introduce it. Mapbox is a platform for location-based data. It allows you to host your data with them so that you can stream it into your web maps, and...

Where the streets have no names

Navigating Streets with No Name

Where streets have no names, confusion creates geo biz opportunities. Those of us in the business of mapping take pride in our wayfinding skills. Yet, on a recent trip to Florence, I found myself searching aimlessly for my hotel in the city’s medieval street layout. Something was definitely wrong when I ended up between numbers...

Caretographic Representations

In parts of the world where both man-made and natural catastrophes frequently occur, how are geospatial technologies being used? And for those of us whose jobs are to create maps of construction sites and other built-up areas, how can we responsibly use the same technology to monitor destruction and wreckage? I pondered these tough questions...