Category Archives: Aerial/UAS

AUVs: Crucial to Seafloor Mapping Effort

In 1775, in Saybrook, Connecticut, the brothers David and Ezra Bushnell built Turtle, a little egg-shaped wooden submarine held together by iron straps, with a 30-minute air supply. The next year, in New York Harbor, Turtle engaged in the first naval battle in history involving a submarine. The first autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), undersea systems...

MAPPS 2020 Geospatial Excellence Awards

MAPPS honored members with the 2020 Geospatial Excellence Awards as part of the organization’s 14th annual Awards Presentation that took place January 26, 2021. The event was hosted by Riegl USA in conjunction with the 2021 winter meeting in Orlando, Florida. The Geospatial Excellence Awards are presented to regular and associate member firms whose entries...

iPhone Pro 12 – Survey device??

There is a buzz on the underground, geospatial people are tweeting about lidar in the new iPhone 12 Pro. What really escalated it all was Matterport releasing a new scan app on the Apple store, it was then followed by a few geospatial people alluding to be able to scan cities and even map rooms...

Daenerys; Dothraki; Dubrovnik: How 3D Scanning Built a Game of Clones

How lidar imaging turned Dubrovnik Old Town, Croatia, into a realistic fantasy world! The sight of King’s Landing, the capital and largest city of the Seven Kingdoms, is spectacular. The population found within verges on half a million but from a bird’s eye view, it is serene and calm, with the gentle sounds of Blackwater Bay in the...

Christoph Hinte

Doers: Christoph Hinte

Christoph Hinte on 25 years at Intergeo Christoph Hinte is the organizer of INTERGEO, the world’s biggest annual geospatial trade fair and conference. As CEO of HINTE Expo & Conference, he has been involved in the development and strategy of INTERGEO events since in 1995. Hinte tells xyHt why this year’s event, October 13 to...

Safety First: Using Small Drones to Map Unsafe Sites

Traditionally, photogrammetry based on aerial images and stereo plotting, has been the realm of large mapping companies capable of affording the onerous ownership of planes and the high personnel cost of pilots, navigators and camera operators. The equipment used to convert the stereoscopic pairs into contour line maps cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and...